Weaver and Barnes Family Notes

 

One of the earliest settlers of what is now Glover Park was a butcher named Michael Weaver, possibly the son of a German immigrant, who raised a family in a small frame house on the east side of Wisconsin Avenue, opposite Holy Rood Cemetery. Weaver’s sons and grandsons prospered in the butcher trade, and would eventually consolidate a great deal of the adjoining land, building themselves houses along the east side of Wisconsin Avenue. Michael Weaver’s son Henry married a widow named Barnes, whose sons by her first marriage also learned the butcher trade.

Both families were prominent in the Methodist Protestant Church, and were instrumental in the founding of Mount Pleasant Chapel and Mount Tabor Church, the predecessors of the original Saint Luke’s Church, at the intersection of Wisconsin Avenue and 35th Street. Barnes’s wife Alice was honored as the first member of the congregation, and his daughter, Pauline Barnes Woodruff, was its longtime organist. For many years Theodore Barnes’s house on Wisconsin Avenue served as the church parsonage.

By 1956, when the extension of Whitehaven Parkway, from MacArthur Boulevard to Massachusetts Avenue, seemed imminent, it had been 140 years, and five generations, since Michael Weaver had started his family here. The parkway extension was eventually called off, but by then the two families had already moved out of the way.

 

 

Origins

Family history holds that the typical Weaver beard style, with clean upper lip, was a Dunker––i.e. German Baptist Brethren––influence from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania; and that the founders of the Weaver family of Georgetown resided in the Middletown Valley of Frederick County, Maryland, for a period of time. (J.L. Weaver Reminiscences, 1937, Georgetown Public Library, Peabody Room)

A 1790 resident of Frederick County, Maryland, named Micael Weaver, with four sons and a daughter, and a 1796 Frederick County Federalist voter named Michael Weever, may be references to the father of the first Weaver in Georgetown.

 

 

Michael Weaver of Georgetown

Michael Weaver (1786-1872)

Born in Frederick County, Maryland, October 7, 1786

Baptized in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Frederick, Maryland.

 

Circa 1809, married Elizabeth Wissinger, born Maryland, May 10, 1789

The surname Wissinger/Wisinger/Wiesinger appears in membership rolls of the Zion Church, Middletown, Maryland, and in the First German Reformed church, Frederick, Maryland (which also has a large number of Webers).

 

Michael Weaver appears in the 1800 census of Frederick, Maryland, but was in Georgetown, possibly as early as 1813––“Mr. Weaver’s child” September 27, 1813, stained coffin (William King Mortality Journal)–– and certainly by 1815, when he is a witness that to the last will and testament of his neighbor Joseph Riffle. First son Henry is listed in the 1870 census as born in DC in 1816. The Weaver family dates its residence on Georgetown Heights to 1816 or 1819. (“Gardens of Beauty”, Evening Star, August 13, 1925, p.1; “Robt Weaver, Head of Utility, Dies Suddenly”, Washington Post, September 30, 1934, p.M1)

 

This may refer to the father of Michael Weaver: “Mr. Weaver”, June 10, 1821, stained coffin

(William King Mortality Journal)

 

 

 

Michael Weaver Buys Land

–– Loan of $3123 by Thomas Hyde from the Union Bank, secured by lots 40, 250, and 251 in Beatty and Hawkins’ Addition to Georgetown, and part of The Slip, and part of Pretty Prospects. (The Beatty and Hawkins’ Addition to Georgetown portion of the purchase starts at the SE intersection of Congo Lane, then with the south side of Wilberforce Street, and back to Congo Lane. It does not front on High Street.)

–– $940 loan or mortgage secured by land in Beatty and Hawkins’ Addition to Georgetown and Pretty Prospects. Loan is by Ninian Magruder, or by Howe.

––Purchase of said land from Thomas Hyde for $1000.

(DC Liber AY49 (1820) ff.126, 216/129 and 230/137)

 

 

 

 

Michael Weaver, 1820 Census of Georgetown, D.C.

1 daughter under 26, 3 sons under 16

 

“Michael Weaver’s child”, September 8, 1831 stained coffin (William King Mortality Journal)

 

Michael Weaver, 1830 Census of Georgetown, D.C.

10 persons (6 sons, 2 daughters), no slaves

 

Michael Weaver, 1840 Census of Georgetown, D.C.

10 persons, no slaves

 

 

Michael Weaver, highest bidder, buys lot to build new house on High Street at Wilberforce Street; $208 for lot 13 in the town of Wilberforce, and lot 5 in Wilberforce with a house on it on High Street. (DC Liber JAS24 (1851) ff.415/320, 418/322)

(This is the outcome of a case––estate of Catherine Kuhns, died 1849––in which Sarah Kuhns and Paul Eschbach complain against Paul Kuhns.)

 

Michael Weaver’s 1820 purchase had been at the southeast corner of Congo Lane and Wilberforce Streets. In 1851 he purchased land fronting on High Street (Wisconsin Avenue). (DC Liber JAS26 (1851) f.418)

Agreement between Michael Weaver and Cornelius Barber, concerning right-of-way thru Weaver land to lot 258, the Barber lot on High Street. (DC Liber JAS72 (1854) f.32/25)

 

 

1865 Georgetown Assessments:

Parts of Beatty and Hawkins Lots 252 and 253;

2-story brick dwelling, and a back building, worth $2800;

Small 2-story frame tenement at SE corner of Wilberforce Street and Congo Lane (his first house).

 

August, 1868, Joseph and Robert Weaver deed land to Michael Weaver. Observatory Lane is shown as Barnard’s Road, just south of the Poorhouse. (County Surveys Levy Court I, DC Surveyor’s Office)

 

“Michael Weaver, perhaps the oldest butcher in the District, died at his residence on Georgetown Heights last Wednesday, the 23rd of January, 1872, age 86.” (Georgetown Courier, January 27, 1872)

 

 

“Upon the death of my said wife Elizabeth I give devise and bequeath the house and lot in which I now reside, situated at the corner of High and Wilberforce streets in Geo.Town… which was conveyed to me by William Redin, trustee, by deed dated seventeenth of April 1851, and recorded in Liber J.A.S. No.24 folios 418.&c… with all the household furniture therein, to my daughter Rebecca S. Weaver… on the condition that she shall take care of and furnish a home to her aunt, Susan Visinger [Wissinger] during her natural life.”

“I give devise and bequeath to my son Joseph Weaver my old home and former residence situated at the south east corner of Congo Lane and Wilberforce streets in Geo.Town aforesaid and being the same property conveyed to me by Thomas Hyde by deed dated thirteenth of May 1820 and recorded in Liber A.Y. No.49 folios 230.&c… also, to said Joseph, my lot situated at the northeast intersection of said Congo Lane and Wilberforce streets… conveyed to me by William Redin, trustee, by deed dated seventeenth of April 1851, and recorded in Liber J.A.S. No.24 folios 415.&c…”

(Michael Weaver, will filed 1872, box 49, District of Columbia Archives)

 

Michael and Elizabeth Weaver are buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Lot 29, bought 1851.

 

 

 

Henry Weaver (1816-1893)

Henry Weaver, son of Michael Weaver, born DC, January 11, 1816

Henry Weaver married Mary Ann (Baker?) Barnes (1810-1896), widow of Horatio Barnes. Mary Ann Barnes had children by her first husband; they grew up in Henry Weaver’s house, and two boys learned the butcher trade.

Horatio Barnes had sold land to the government for the aqueduct. His widow’s marriage brought land on Conduit Road into the Weaver “portfolio”. Most important was Drovers Rest, which was the Georgetown cattle market (marked “Henry Weaver” in 1878).

(See Barnes Family, below)

 

1854, Mary Weaver transferred from Methodist Episcopal Church (Dumbarton) to Methodist Protestant (Congress Street).

In 1860 Henry Weaver lived on the west side of Wisconsin Avenue just north of the cemetery (377 High Street). This property was developed around 1909 as Hall Place.

In 1862 Henry Weaver had three slaves through his stepchildren, and a slave of his own, Jane Johnson, age 34.

1865 Assessment: part of lot 253 in Beatty and Hawkins’ Addition to Georgetown, with two small frame tenements and a slaughter house; parts of lots 254, 255, and all of 269, 270, 271, and 275 in Beatty and Hawkins’ Addition to Georgetown; lot 271 includes a large 2-story frame residence, sheds, barracks, and a frame tenement on the south part.

Henry Weaver, Trustee, Congress Street Methodist Protestant Church, and involved, with brother Joseph Weaver, in the founding of Mount Pleasant Chapel––later Mount Tabor Church, and later still Saint Luke’s Church.

1880 census, Henry Weaver, retired butcher with asthma

Wife Mary born DC, parents born Virginia

 

Left real and personal estate to his wife, Mary Ann Weaver, and after her death, to his daughter Mary Ann E. Hall. “I acknowledge holding in my hands of my said wife’s money from her father and mother’s estate, and also her dower money from land sold to the United States from the estate of the late Horatio Barnes, which was nineteen hundred and thirty-seven dollars and twelve and a half cents, and other moneys belonging to her, the whole amounting to twelve thousand and two hundred and fifty dollars and thirty-four cents, which shall be paid to her out of my said estate. ––Item the second. I give and bequeath to Angeline Drinkhouse five hundred dollars. ––Item the third. I give and bequeath to Theodore Barnes five hundred dollars and my gold watch and chain.”

(Henry Weaver, will filed 1893, box 143, District of Columbia Archives)

Henry Weaver died December 8, 1893

 

His widow Mary Ann Weaver died in 1899

“To my daughter, Angeline Drinkhouse, six hundred and forty-five dollars and seventy cents, which is one third of nineteen hundred and thirty-seven dollars and twelve and a half cents, dower money allowed me by the Circuit Court of the District  of Columbia from land sold to the United States from the estate of the late Horatio Barnes, and three thousand two hundred and seventy-one dollars and eight cents from other moneys which I heired from my father and mother’s estate… to my son, Theodore Barnes [same as above]… to my grandson, William Horatio Barnes [same as above]… to my daughter, Mary Ann E. Hall, two thousand seven hundred and seventy-one dollars and eight cents from other moneys which I heired from my father and mother’s estate… I especially desire and request that my said children and their heirs shall faithfully see that the [Barnes] family graveyards on Drover’s Rest and on Harlem Farm be kept enclosed by a good fence, and that they be cleaned out once every year.” (Executor: Rev. Edward J. Drinkhouse.)

(Mary Ann Weaver, will filed 1899, District of Columbia Archives)

 

 

Mary Anna E. Weaver  (1849-1936) 

Mary Anna E. Weaver was the child of Henry Weaver and Mary A. Barnes. In 1878 she married Philip Thomas Hall.

Philip Thomas Hall was born in Portland, Maine, in 1854; in 1856 his family moved to Baltimore, where Hall eventually entered the Methodist Protestant ministry. Hall ministered in various congregations until 1882, when he asked not to be reappointed, because of throat trouble.

In 1885 he opened a haberdashery business at 908 F Street, “Shirt Manufacture and Men’s Furnishings”. Hall retired in 1920, and died in 1925.  (“Philip T. Hall––Retired Shirt Manufacturer Dies From Effects of Influenza”, Washington Post, February 15, 1925, p.9; “Philip T. Hall Dies––Long in Business Here. Retired Merchant, Formerly Minister, Was Prominent in Trade and Masonic Circles” Evening Star, February 14, 1925)

A daughter, Mary Adelle Hall (1879-1952), married Arthur Theodore Kreh (1883-1952), of Frederick, Maryland, secretary of P.T. Hall Inc. , at her father’s house, 2438 Wisconsin Avenue. (“Social and Personal”, Washington Post, November 17, 1908, P.7)

 

 

 

David Weaver (1817-1881)

David Weaver, son of Michael Weaver

Born September 26, 1817

Married Helen: a son Edward was born in 1844

Died, July 26, 1881

 

 

Samuel Weaver (1819-1869)

Samuel Weaver, son of Michael weaver

Born November 3, 1819

Died September 5, 1869

 

 

Rebecca S. Weaver (1821-1898)

Rebecca S. Weaver, daughter of Michael Weaver

Born August 29, 1821

Unmarried, took care of parents, 1870 census

Died July 29, 1898

 

 

Thomas Weaver (1824-1884)

Thomas Weaver, son of Michael Weaver

Born January 17, 1824

He is listed as having marched in Lincoln’s first inauguration, with Michael Homiller.

1865 assessed for part of lot 256, Beatty and Hawkins’ Addition to Georgetown; and for a part of lot 253, between High Street and Congo Lane, with a 2-story brick house at 352 High Street.

Thomas Weaver acquired Murray Barker’s land in 1868 (DC Liber ECE28 (1868) f.90/95. See Murray Barker and His Descendants.)

Still in parental home in 1870 census

When Thomas Weaver died he owned stock in the Metropolitan Rail Road Company, the Columbia Rail Road Company, and the Capitol, North O Street, and South Washington Rail Road Company.

Died April 3, 1884

DC will box 90

Thomas Weaver’s estate was divided by sister Rebecca and by nephews and nieces, and by the children of Samuel Weaver and Charles Weaver.

 

 

Charles Weaver (1828-1883)

Charles Weaver, son of Michael Weaver, born February 28, 1828

He was partially deaf so he changed vocation from butcher to farmer.

Married Augusta, and had eight or more children, starting about 1865.

In 1850 Charles and Joseph Weaver bought Whitehaven Farm on Conduit Road, west of Foundry Branch. His house was at Lowell and Loughborough, called “Whitehaven”––but it was distinct from the house of the same name at 4928 Reservoir Road.  (“Charles Weaver of White Haven”, 1937, ms., Historical Society of Washington)

Charles’s son, John L. Weaver, born 1865, briefly attended the county school later called the Tunlaw Road School, and then Conduit Road School. The mortgage banking and real estate firm of Weaver Brothers, Inc. was founded in 1888 by John L. Weaver and William H. Barnes. The firm lasted for a century. (Washington Post, September 3, 1988, p.C1; March 30, 1989, p.1)

 

BARNES & WEAVER, Real Estate Brokers, 629 F St. N. W., Washington, D.C.

Bird’s Eye View of Barnes and Weaver’s Addition to Brookland (1895, Library of Congress)

http://ghostsofdc.org/2014/02/19/1895-birds-eye-view-brookland/#sthash.gJJkTz74.dpuf

 

Charles Weaver (1828-1883) had a son named Charles, the author of a typed manuscript in which he recalls that his father changed his vocation and became a farmer, rather than following his brothers in the butcher trade.  The young Charles Weaver attended the Conduit Road School. (“Charles Weaver of White Haven”, 1937, ms., Historical Society of Washington)

In 1914 a Weaver family house stood at Cathedral and MacArthur. The Augusta Weaver property was called “Birchland”. (Augusta Weaver, Reminiscences, 1897, ms., Historical Society of Washington)

Charles Weaver, vestry of Saint Albans Church

 

Charles and Augusta Weaver,

Oak Hill Cemetery

DC wills: 1883, box 84; 1917, box 587

 

 

 

Joseph Weaver (1826-1881)

Joseph Weaver, son of Michael Weaver, born January 5, 1826

Married Catherine Cammack (1826-1900) at Congress Street Methodist Protestant Church, circa 1853

Joseph is said to have been born in the tenement on Wilberforce Street that was Michael Weaver’s first property.  The Holland family descendants have a portrait of him.  (Star, November 16, 1956, p.A23).

 

“Joseph Weaver’s servant, buried in Catholic Ground” by Joseph Birch Colored Burial Record, November 1, 1860

Maria committed July 2, 1857 for safekeeping by B. Milburn; released July 10, to Joseph Weaver. (Probably Mariah Douglass, age 21: Weaver had just bought her. Jerry M. Hynson, District of Columbia Runaway And Fugitive Slave Cases 1848-1863, 1999)

1860 lists shows 3 slaves

 

Joseph’s nephew Charles later recounted that Joseph bought the members of the Cephus family at a slave auction on the spur of the moment, in order to prevent the family from being broken up. (“Charles Weaver of White Haven”, 1937, ms., Historical Society of Washington)

 

Assessed in 1865 for “A fine 2-story frame” building with stables in lot 252, Beatty and Hawkins’ Addition to Georgetown

Joseph and Catherine are the donors of land for Mount Pleasant Chapel at 35th and Wisconsin.

1875, Joseph Weaver bought the Robinson estate (house of Samuel Turner, called Mount Hope) for $13,000. (DC Liber 801 (1875) f. 446; Georgetown Courier, July 10, 1875; Richard P. Jackson, Chronicles of Georgetown)

Circa 1870-1890, Joseph Weaver and wife were members of Congress Street Methodist Protestant Church, and of Mount Pleasant Chapel/Mount Tabor Church

Joseph Weaver had three sons and a daughter, Mrs. Joseph Freeman. The four children built four homes on Weaver Hill.

Catherine is in the 1890 directory on 32nd St. Extended.

 

Joseph Weaver died February 5, 1881

 

Catherine Cammack Weaver died April 9, 1900 at 2417 32nd Street (2117? Wisconsin) of Bright’s disease.

She has a commemorative window in Saint Albans Episcopal Church.

 

At the time of his death Joseph Weaver, George Kengla, and John Kelley manufactured soap at 3244 Water (K) Street

 

Heirs of Joseph and Charles Weaver sold the Weaver land on Conduit Road in 1892 through real estate brokers William H. Barnes and John L. Weaver. The mortgage banking and real estate firm of Weaver Brothers, Inc. was founded in 1888 by John L. Weaver and William H. Barnes. The firm lasted for a century.  (Barnes and Weaver’s Cuckold’s Delight, between 14th, 16th, Girard and Irving Streets NE, 1903 Baist Map of Washington, D.C., Plate 27; Washington Post, September 3, 1988, p.C1; March 30, 1989, p.1)

 

BARNES & WEAVER, Real Estate Brokers, 629 F St. N. W., Washington, D.C.

Bird’s Eye View of Barnes and Weaver’s Addition to Brookland (1895, Library of Congress)

http://ghostsofdc.org/2014/02/19/1895-birds-eye-view-brookland/#sthash.gJJkTz74.dpuf

 

In 1926, the heirs of Joseph Weaver––Robert D. Weaver, wife Mary, William N. Weaver and wife Lida, Henry E. Weaver and wife Margaret, and Mary Ellen Freeman––sold Mount Hope to Alexander C. Kirk. Eventual buyer was Evalyn Walsh McLean (Hope Diamond).

 

 

Children of Joseph and Catherine Weaver

 

Robert D. Weaver (1852-1934)

Married the girl next door, Mary A. R. Yeabower (note that initials spell Mary!) Also, that his brother, Henry E. Weaver (1861?- 1936), 2029 Wisconsin Avenue, married Mary’s sister, Margaret R. Yeabower!)

 

“Mr. Robert Weaver, of Georgetown, celebrated Thanksgiving by being married to Miss Mary Yeabower, at the P.E. church in the county, and his sister, Miss Ella Weaver, determined not to be outdone by her brother, gave her hand in matrimony the same morning to Mr. John Freeman, at Weaver place, the residence of her father.”

(“City Talk and Chatter”, Washington Post, November 29, 1879, p.4)

 

1870-1900, Robert was in the wholesale meatpacking business with his father, and at Weaver’s Meat Store, SE corner of Wisconsin and Dumbarton. George Scheele, an old resident, remembered that Robert Weaver had a meat market at 1335 Wisconsin Avenue in 1890, and that the building was erected at that time.  (The Georqetowner, August 25, 1960)

Circa 1900, at age 48, he sold out of the meat business, and used the money to organize the Metropolitan Rail Road Company, of which he was president until 1916.

He was also vice president of Farmers and Mechanics Bank, Georgetown. Ran old Dominion Rail Road Company until 1924. Retired to devote himself to Washington Gas Light Company, of which he was for a time president. At one time president Georgetown Gas Company.

(Washington Post, September 30, 1934, p.M1)

 

Mary Ellen Weaver (1857?-1936), married English immigrant Joseph R. Freeman, who was a florist, with greenhouses on Conduit Road and on Reservoir Road, at Mount Hope, Joseph Weaver’s house on Wisconsin Avenue, between R and Reservoir. Lived at 2319 (later renumbered 2019) Wisconsin Avenue.

 

“Mr. Robert Weaver, of Georgetown, celebrated Thanksgiving by being married to Miss Mary Yeabower, at the P.E. church in the county, and his sister, Miss Ella Weaver, determined not to be outdone by her brother, gave her hand in matrimony the same morning to Mr. John Freeman, at Weaver place, the residence of her father.”

(“City Talk and Chatter”, Washington Post, November 29, 1879, p.4)

 

William M. Weaver (1859?-1936), 2117 Wisconsin Avenue, married to Lida Britt.

 

Henry E. Weaver (1861?-1936), 2029 Wisconsin Avenue, married Margaret R. Yeabower, entered his father’s meatpacking concern.

 

Joseph T. Weaver, born circa 1863

 

John C. Weaver, died age 2 (Georgetown Courier, July 20, 1867)

 

 

 

The Barnes Family

Henry Weaver married Mary Ann Barnes (1810-1896), widow of Horatio Barnes (1806?-1845). Horatio Barnes had sold land to the government for the aqueduct. His widow’s marriage brought land on Conduit Road into the Weaver “portfolio”. Most important of these parcels was Drovers Rest, which was the Georgetown cattle market (marked “Henry Weaver” in 1878).

 

Horatio Barnes inherited slaves Dennis, Cators, Patrick, Jude, and Linda from Basil Barnes in 1845.

Horatio’s children Henry, Theodore, and Angeline Barnes, inherited Dennis, Cato, and Sarah.

Patrick and Cato, committed May 5, 1849 as runaways by William Morgan. Released May 7, 1849, to Henry Weaver. (Jerry M. Hynson, District of Columbia Runaway And Fugitive Slave Cases 1848-1863, 1999)

 

Mary Ann Barnes had children by her first husband; they grew up in Henry Weaver’s house, and two boys learned the butcher trade.

 

 

Angeline Barnes Drinkhouse (1835-1911)

Member of Congress Street Church

Married Edward Drinkhouse, a leading Methodist, circa 1867.

 

 

Edward Drinkhouse 

 

 

Henry Barnes (1838?-1868)

Henry S. Barnes, butcher, died August 5th at his residence on M Street between 7th and 8th streets. (Georgetown Courier, August 8, 1868)

 

 

Theodore Barnes 1845-1918, Beef butcher, 1870 census

 

Mrs. Theodore Barnes was the official “First Member” of Mount Pleasant Methodist Protestant Chapel, the predecessor to Saint Luke’s Church. The writer is her son, Julian Francis Barnes. (Smithsonian National Postal Museum, via Jerry McCoy, DC Public Library)

Mrs. Theodore Barnes was the official “First Member” of Mount Pleasant Methodist Protestant Chapel, the predecessor to Saint Luke’s Church. The writer is her son, Julian Francis Barnes. (Smithsonian National Postal Museum, via Jerry McCoy, DC Public Library)

 

The Jamestown Exposition, commemorating the 300th anniversary of the founding of the colony, was held from April 26 to December 1, 1907, in Norfolk, Virginia. (Smithsonian National Postal Museum, via Jerry McCoy, DC Public Library)

The Jamestown Exposition, commemorating the 300th anniversary of the founding of the colony, was held from April 26 to December 1, 1907, in Norfolk, Virginia. (Smithsonian National Postal Museum, via Jerry McCoy, DC Public Library)

 

“Theo. Barnes is building a fine frame dwelling opposite the residence of Henry Weaver, on Pole Hill.” (Georgetown Courier, May 6, 1871)

Married Alice S. Toole circa 1871; she died 1932.

Alice Barnes was the official “First Member” of Mount Pleasant Chapel, and was honored as such in 1924 by its successor, Mount Tabor Church.

For forty or more years the pastor’s of the predecessor to Saint Luke’s Church had no parsonage, and lived with Alice and Theodore Barnes at 2433 (later 2133) Wisconsin Avenue.

Mount Tabor Church Bazaar. Supper table: Mrs. B.F. Hunt; Chairman: Mrs. Theodore Barnes; Ice cream table: Mrs. Sherier. (Star, January 13, 1897 Section 8, p.7)

Theodore Barnes died March 23, 1918

The Barnes graves are in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lot 21 east.

 

 

 

Children of Theodore and Alice T. Barnes

 

Pauline (Jennie) Barnes Woodruff (1874-1918), church organist at Mount Tabor Church for many years, married Benjamin Woodruff.

 

George Henry Barnes (1875-1894)

 

Bessie Alice Barnes (1876-1959) of 2202 Hall Place

 

Beulah Benton Barnes Weaver (1879 or 1882-1957), of 2133 Wisconsin Avenue, was a painter who trained at the Art Students League in New York and the Corcoran Museum School, as well as with the Italian Peppino Gino Mangravite who made his career in the United States, and the German emigre Karl Knaths. Beulah Weaver was a member of the Society of Washington Artists. Her exhibition history included shows at the Anderson Galleries, New York; Washington Women’s Club; Salons of America (1925, 1927-30); Corcoran Gallery biennials (1930, 1932); Independent Artists Exhibition, Washington, D.C. (1935, purchase award); and the Society of Washington Artists (1935, prize; 1948, prize). She worked for three decades as art director and teacher at the Madeira School in Greenway, Virginia. She married George A. Weaver, of the Weaver Bros. real estate firm. Their children were B. Woodruff Weaver, and Alicia Barnes Weaver (1904?-1984)

 

Mabel Angeline Barnes (1881-1948). Lived at 2433 Wisconsin Avenue in 1912.

 

Louis Coulbourne Barnes, born 1883 (Named for Thomas Coulbourne, pastor of Mount Pleasant Chapel)

 

Percy Valiant Barnes, died in infancy (Named for Rev. Percy Valiant, pastor of Mount Pleasant Chapel)

 

Col. Theodore Barnes, Jr., USA (ret.) (1886-1973), one-time White house aide.

 

Maj. General Julian Francis Barnes, USA (ret.) (1889-1961), Arlington Cemetery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Theodore and Julian Barnes were Washington representatives of the Pullman Automobile Company.  (Washington Post, April 2, 1911, p.35)

 

 

Capt. Theodore Barnes, Jr., US Cavalry, 1920  (Library of Congress)

 

 

___________________________________________________________

 Carlton Fletcher

 The citation and acknowledgement of my research is greatly appreciated.

All rights reserved.

 

 Questions and corrections may be directed to

carlton@gloverparkhistory.com

 

The support of the Advisory Neighborhood Council (3B) is gratefully acknowledged.